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Hank - O. Bocki (?)

Missnano

O. vulgaris
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Jan 2, 2011
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This is a scan of page 282 in Mark Norman's Cephalopods A World Guide. Sadly it is out of print and VERY hard to find. I wish he would update it (copy right 2003) but it is the best octopus reference to be found even now (click thumb to enlarge).
View attachment 64120
There are several sources for small crabs on line and eBay is always worth checking but Paul Sachs has been are reliable supplier for years. If you can get him/her to take thawed mysis, by all means, use them. Including crabs, however, is going to be your best primary food. For the mercs, I also used newly killed shore shrimp. O. bocki may be able to catch them live but I found the merc only did this well when young.

There is no need to remove the snails. They work for clean up and if he wants to eat them on occasion, it is fine.
Very nice! Thank you!

Do they bite if I wanna touch? I've seen some nasty bites, to people petting theirs haha!
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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You are not the first to ask :wink:. Here is a thread on recorded bites (some rather humorous). Yes they can bite but it is rare. All octopuses have some kind of venom and the reaction can be a slight swelling to a several week numbness. There are mixed thoughts on touching and our scientists are against it for numerous reasons, keeper safety being the primary. That being said, I enjoy trying to interact with them. I recommend not trying to touch them but to let them approach and touch you. First touch is always a thrill and a shock to both parties. Try not to jerk away, the octopus is most likely to touch and then retreat rapidly. The dwarfs are less likely to be as curious as the larger animals but I did have one merc with a lot of personality. Almost all successful animals (animals that survive the first two weeks and live out a normal lifespan) will allow hand feeding at some point.
 

Missnano

O. vulgaris
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You are not the first to ask :wink:. Here is a thread on recorded bites (some rather humorous). Yes they can bite but it is rare. All octopuses have some kind of venom and the reaction can be a slight swelling to a several week numbness. There are mixed thoughts on touching and our scientists are against it for numerous reasons, keeper safety being the primary. That being said, I enjoy trying to interact with them. I recommend not trying to touch them but to let them approach and touch you. First touch is always a thrill and a shock to both parties. Try not to jerk away, the octopus is most likely to touch and then retreat rapidly. The dwarfs are less likely to be as curious as the larger animals but I did have one merc with a lot of personality. Almost all successful animals (animals that survive the first two weeks and live out a normal lifespan) will allow hand feeding at some point.
First two weeks are crucial for them in a new habitat isn't it? Thought I read that somewhere.
The lfs said they had him for awhile so he was established there so hopefully that means promising things.
 

DWhatley

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Yes, I always hold my breath for the full 14 days but it seems that if they make it that long in their new environment, they live out their normal lifespan. Keep in mind that they only live for between 8 month to a year (dwarfs living shorter than larger animals in general) and you don't know the age when they arrive. We have had a few species to produce offspring that survived and find the estimated ages to run true for the species we can measure. An alternate understanding (circumstantial) of living a full lifespan is observing senescence. When an octopus reaches the end of its natural life, in addition to not eating (the first sign) it will begin to lose its ability to color and will often wander aimlessly around the tank.
 

sirreal

Vampyroteuthis
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great looking octo. Before anyone else says anything they are called arms and no tenticals. No big deal and I did myself when I fist got into octos. Good luck with Hank. Look forward to reading more about him/her. And lots of pics are good LOL
 

DWhatley

Kraken
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To arm :wink: yourself with a bit more understanding about why, for cephalopods, the distinction is real you need to understand a little about octopuses cousins. Both squid and cuttlefish have 10 appendages. Eight of them are arms with suckers like the octopus but the other two are designated as tentacles and have suckers only at the tips. These are specialized for catching food. The last member of the extant cephalopods, the nautilus has only suckerless tentacles (about 90 of them).
 

Missnano

O. vulgaris
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To arm :wink: yourself with a bit more understanding about why, for cephalopods, the distinction is real you need to understand a little about octopuses cousins. Both squid and cuttlefish have 10 appendages. Eight of them are arms with suckers like the octopus but the other two are designated as tentacles and have suckers only at the tips. These are specialized for catching food. The last member of the extant cephalopods, the nautilus has only suckerless tentacles (about 90 of them).
Wow, that's really cool! Thank you for that, as Infind them so interesting.
 

Missnano

O. vulgaris
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Update: I've noticed when Hank is at his calmest he's a bluish, gray color with dark splotches. His eyes stick up off his mantal for sure. Kinda bug eyed. Pretty sure he's a boy based of the third arm curling post I read on the forum.

He does change colors though, from blue/gray to dark brown to almost black. (He was brown when I got him, but I'm pretty sure he was upset with his tank condition at the time.) I'm hoping his blue/gray with dark splotches isn't a sign of old age though.( senescence) But I can't find another octo his size that has the colors like what he does.

He's eating well, and even almost escaped the other day. He thinks he's sly I tell ya.
 

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