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"giant" squid size

Sordes

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Interestingly similar experiments were already made with tadpoles many decades ago. After the removing of their thyroid glands they grew and grew and grew, but never reached maturity and became only frogs after they were feed with special hormons.
 
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Bulls versus steers, from my experience growing up in farming country, though not farming, is really more about insuring that the best males in a farmers herd are left "whole" for breeding purposes, and the not so perfect specimens are sterilized so they can't impregnate the females before the desired sires can get to them. Sterilization also cuts down significantly on aggression, which is one reason that from time to time it has been suggested for certain male recidivistic criminals of human persuasion.
 

Sordes

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Okay, we begin to talk about "unteuthology", I hope nobody will remove it...
The lesser aggression and the better controlling of sexual mating between different animals are important reasons why castration and sterilisation has been made since ages. But the positive result of better growth and more meat was also a reason.
 
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Steve and Kat are usually pretty laid back about losing focus if the original thread is actually ceph science related. Still, the question remains, except for satisfying curiousty, why in the world would anyone want to castrate a squid to see if it would grow larger?
 

monty

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sorseress said:
Steve and Kat are usually pretty laid back about losing focus if the original thread is actually ceph science related. Still, the question remains, except for satisfying curiousty, why in the world would anyone want to castrate a squid to see if it would grow larger?
Well, I'd be curious about the result, since cephs seem to have preserved some pretty ancient animal hormonal and developmental systems-- in the same way that fruit fly genetics showed us a lot about human development or squid giant axons told us about human nerves, perhaps it would be a Rosetta stone for hormonal control of animal development. Or, perhaps it would lead to giant watch-squids Erich could put in the moat around his creepy castle to devour meddling teenagers and their dog...
 

Steve O'Shea

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I would be pretty interested in the results myself. Gigantisism and miniaturisation are two common ways in which speciation occurs. The Giant Squid, Architeuthis dux, is almost a gigantic version of other species of squid, and it's almost as if the thing matured very late in life and kept on growing in the interim.

One of the problems that we are facing with cultured squid is that they do not seem to ever attain the same size as wild stock. This probably reflects the size of the tanks that we are using, that in some way constrain growth .... we are good at rearing 'pygmy squid'. It does tell us that size of the animal is most definitely affected by environmental factors (the opposite of gigantisism in our case). Until I get larger facilities I'll not know if it is dietary or tank size/configuration.
 

Sordes

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This phenomen is known in several fish-species, which keep also very small in small tanks, but there are also many species which always grow in the same way, indifferently how large the tank is.
 

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