flamboyant cuttlefish has two hectocotylus and uses them for hunting?

Polpessa

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:lol: this thread makes my day. o_O
Does this thread "make your day" (I keep hearing it in Clint's voice!) because of my naivety in thinking editors should check what they publish or because you find it funny that someone who studied zoology would write what he did about the flamboyant cuttlefish?

I also asked Bret Grasse who raises flambos at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and he said this:

"Your assumptions are correct. Flamboyant cuttlefish have a single hectocotylus (modified arm) that is completely unrelated to their two feeding tentacles. It is not used in any way during hunting. The hectocotylus looks nearly identical to the other arms except it has a fine grove running along its center laterally. 8 arms 2 feeding tentacles."
D Whatley, you made very good points about both the nature of online material and new research.

Now I'm curious to know if the hectocotylus is indeed the left ventral arm or not, I will look at some footage we have here to see if I can tell from that.
 

DWhatley

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@Polpessa, you have me intrigued by some of the things I found and wondered how they could possibly have been written as fact. I did figure out the basic source of the females only have three (or a total of 6 instead of 8) arms. Dr. Hanlon was quoted in an article (referring to the Australian giant cuttlefish) that the females lack two of the flattened arms. The intended meaning was to point out sexual dimorphism and that the two of the male arms are wider and flatter, not that the female had two less. The Wikipidea article used a version of that interview to write the entry and misunderstood the statement.

It gets worse :roll: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hectocotylus shows squid tentacles as hectocotyli in a diagram. It also has a list of referring to different species and says,
Among Decapodiformes (ten-limbed cephalopods), generally either one or both of arms IV are hectocotylized.
Arms 4 are the back most arms as numbering begins at the eyes.

From the same article, tThis is also suspect (referring to the paper nautilus)
During copulation, the hectocotylus breaks off from the male.The funnel–mantle locking apparatus on the hectocotylus keeps it lodged in the pallial cavity of the female.

It is getting harder to blame a self study author.

@Tintenfisch - you can chime in at any time :sagrin:
 
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DWhatley

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So off on a rabbit trail it occurred to me to use the FAO catalog I have in PDF form to see what it shows. Under cuttlefish and squid it does indeed show the hectocotylus as arm L4 but confirms the only animal I think I know something about (octopuses) as generally being R3 (whew!)
 

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DWhatley

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tonmo

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because you find it funny that someone who studied zoology would write what he did about the flamboyant cuttlefish
that's the one! That, combined with the absurdity of the error. :razz: As for this:
because of my naivety in thinking editors should check what they publish
I have fallen for this many, many times. It's a bit embarrassing when I tweet or post something on FB on behalf of TONMO only to find that the "news" I was sharing was incorrect / not properly researched. :oops::oopsie:
 

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