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Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian Bobtailed Squid, thriving in Wisconsin

DWhatley

Kraken
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Characterization of the adhesive dermal secretion of Euprymna scolopes Berry, 1913 (Cephalopoda)
Janek von Byern,Norbert Cyran,Waltraud Klepal, Marie Therese Nödl, Lisa Klinger 2016 (subscription Science Direct)

Abstract
Bio-adhesion is a common and crucial process in nature and is used by several different species for camouflage, prey capture, hatching or to avoid drifting. Four genera of cephalopods belonging to four different families (Euprymna, Sepiolidae; Idiosepius, Idiosepiidae; Nautilus, Nautilidae; and Sepia, Sepiidae) produce glue for temporary attachment. Euprymna species live in near-shore benthic habitats of the Indo-Pacific Ocean, are nocturnal and bury into the seafloor during the day. The animals secrete adhesives through their epithelial glands to completely coat themselves with sand. In cases of danger, they instantaneously release the sandy coat as a sinking decoy to deflect predators. Earlier morphological investigations have shown that the adhesive gland cells of Euprymna scolopes are scattered on the dorsal epidermis. It has been proposed that neutral mucopolysaccharides, secreted by one gland type (goblet cells), are responsible for adhesion, whereas the release of the glue could be caused by acidic mucoproteins produced by ovate cells in the ventral epidermis. The ultrastructural re-investigation of the Euprymna epithelium in this study has indicated the presence of a new gland type (named flask cell), exclusively located in the dorsal epithelium and always neighboured to the known goblet cells. Based on our histochemical observations, the secretory material of the ovate cells does not display a strong reaction to tests for acidic groups, as had been previously assumed. Within the dermis, a large muscle network was found that was clearly distinctive from the normal mantle musculature. Based on our data, an antagonistic gland system, as previously proposed, seems to be unlikely for Euprymna scolopes. We hypothesize that the adhesive secretion is formed by two gland types (goblet and flask cells). The release of the sand coat may occur mechanically, i.e. by contraction of the dermal mantle muscle, and not chemically through the ovate cells.
 

Severine

Cuttlefish
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In 2004 I had the privilege of designing and installing a squid rearing system at the U of WI Madison for Professors Margaret McFall-Ngai and Ned Ruby. I recently returned to Madison (from my home now in FL) for the 25th Anniversary Pow-Wow of Ned and Margaret’s research on the Hawaiian Bobtailed squid. It was great seeing the Profs again and meeting many of their students, both current and graduates. Most interesting to me was the success they are having in not only keeping the little Bobtailed squid in my systems but getting phenomenal egg production and hatch success so necessary to their research. Squid Meister, Nell Bekiares, took me on a tour of the new lab housing my nine year old systems. I was happy to see they are operating as intended and look in fantastic shape for being Acrylic.



Two years ago the Lab moved into a new building on campus. Above is a picture of one of three systems showing some good piping modification made due to cutting the original PVC for the move. A fourth system was designed as a hatchery.



Nell reported to me they harvest 7,000 baby squid a year. Greater production than they were experiencing in Hawaii, where they circulated NSW continuous flow through. To me that is incredible considering we are using artificial SW and 1000s of miles from their endemic home waters.



Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian Bobtailed Squid less than 24 hours old. What an awesome sight.

In 2013 I got to do it again here in FL. One of the squid labs graduates, Associate Professor Jamie Foster Ph.D., of the U of FL contacted me as a result of my association with the U of WI connection. I recently finished a similar installation at the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, U of FL, Space Life Sciences Lab, located in Exploration Park on the Kennedy Space Center grounds. We filled the system about a month ago and Jamie reported all is well with squid in residence.

Thanks for reading,

Dick
In 2004 I had the privilege of designing and installing a squid rearing system at the U of WI Madison for Professors Margaret McFall-Ngai and Ned Ruby. I recently returned to Madison (from my home now in FL) for the 25th Anniversary Pow-Wow of Ned and Margaret’s research on the Hawaiian Bobtailed squid. It was great seeing the Profs again and meeting many of their students, both current and graduates. Most interesting to me was the success they are having in not only keeping the little Bobtailed squid in my systems but getting phenomenal egg production and hatch success so necessary to their research. Squid Meister, Nell Bekiares, took me on a tour of the new lab housing my nine year old systems. I was happy to see they are operating as intended and look in fantastic shape for being Acrylic.



Two years ago the Lab moved into a new building on campus. Above is a picture of one of three systems showing some good piping modification made due to cutting the original PVC for the move. A fourth system was designed as a hatchery.



Nell reported to me they harvest 7,000 baby squid a year. Greater production than they were experiencing in Hawaii, where they circulated NSW continuous flow through. To me that is incredible considering we are using artificial SW and 1000s of miles from their endemic home waters.



Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian Bobtailed Squid less than 24 hours old. What an awesome sight.

In 2013 I got to do it again here in FL. One of the squid labs graduates, Associate Professor Jamie Foster Ph.D., of the U of FL contacted me as a result of my association with the U of WI connection. I recently finished a similar installation at the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, U of FL, Space Life Sciences Lab, located in Exploration Park on the Kennedy Space Center grounds. We filled the system about a month ago and Jamie reported all is well with squid in residence.

Thanks for reading,

Dick
This is probably a silly question, but in the picture with the eggs on pvc, what materials were used for the individual containers the eggs are housed in? I assume the babies were raised in these same containers until they became benthic?

Thank you!!

Thanks!
 

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