Eocene Cuttles

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Here is a pair of Eocene Belosaepia prongs from Belgium, the larger one being 17 mm long. For comparison with the modern I've added a photo of the pointy end of a modern cuttlebone off a local beach and a view of a Sepia couple with their flesh still on. I've still not seen any examples of these from the local Eocene rocks, but have my eyes open for them.
 

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OB

Colossal Squid
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Now, why indeed have cuttles disappeared/never appeared from/in the western hemisphere...
 

DWhatley

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OB, I have often wondered about that too. I don't think we have nautilus either but why not?
 
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On a quick browse I collected these three quotes:

“There have only been two genera of coleoid cephalopods recovered from Oligocene aged sediments of North America; Oligorostra alabami Ciampaglio & Weaver, 2008 and Oligosella longi Ciampaglio & Weaver, 2008.” , from Weaver et al. (2010). These are thought to be spirulids and not belosaepiids.

“The oldest Sepiinae (Sepia and Archeosepia) occur in the Upper Eocene and Oligocene marls of the Budapest region (Sz6r6nyi, 1933; Wagner, 1938).” , from Hewitt & Pedley (1978).

“Everyone recognises that the older Cenozoic genus Belosaepia Voltz, 1830 is connected to Sepia Linnd, 1758 via Hungarosepia Doyle et al., 1994 ... from the Lutetian-Priabonian of Hungary” , from Hewitt & Jagt (1999).

So a sketched outline might be something like the following?: Late Eocene extinction of Belosaepia and Anomalosaepia in American seas; appearance of Sepia in the seas of Bohemian Europe via Hungarosepia and the opening North Atlantic proving an obstacle to migration of Sepia westwards.
 

DWhatley

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TOO many rabbit trails :biggrin2: I think I missed out on the expanding planet theory somewhere. Is the most current/accepted theory now that material moves between the riffs or is the expanding planet a partially accepted idea? I am just now learning that they teach putting a comma before the "and" in a list :old:
 
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Good fun. Those plate tectonic reconstructions are on a constant-volume Earth. New ocean crust forms at the spreading ridges (e.g. Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and elsewhere ocean crust is consumed as it descends into the mantle at subduction zones (deep sea trenches, e.g. off west coast of Chile). This is a good summary picture. As the Atlantic opens the Pacific shrinks due to subduction around the "Ring of Fire".

I think you could be right about the comma (though it was a crime to put a comma before the "and" when I was a kid) - one (North Carolinan) opinion says "If the items in the list are longer and more complicated, you should place a final comma before the conjunction." Then I looked at the BBC: "Make sure that you don't use a comma before the word and at the end of your list."!

Tomorrow I'm going to go out looking for Eocene cephalopods.
 

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