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[Octopus]: Elephant’s

sedna

Larger Pacific Striped Octopus
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Jul 13, 2008
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Amazing shots!!! I’m loving your photography!
 


ACC4

Blue Ring
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Sep 30, 2021
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Night dive-oh wait no, I think this was actually a night snorkel..Half Moon Bay, Roatan, Honduras. Found a Caribbean reef squid that was at least football sized-she came up to me and touched my mask and hovered by me and was totally curious about me. I think I won her over because my dive torch was lit up and blinding some of the fish the squid was after, giving her a good meal. Then I just floated as still as possible forever and she’d get closer and closer. It was simply amazing. She was most interested in my fins and mask 🤿 it was wonderful. Came across a number of Caribbean Reef Octopuses, this one tolerated me watching him eat for 20 minutes before he slipped away into the crevices leaving behind a pretty intact but bare, skeleton!
I don’t know if it works to upload videos to this site while I’m on the mobile version of the page..?
 

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tonmo

Cthulhu
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Wow, so great! Nice job interacting and making it work - stealth observation mode. What an experience, congrats!

Mobile upload of vids should work, yes! But LMK if you have issues.
 

ACC4

Blue Ring
Registered
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Sep 30, 2021
Messages
33
Hello and welcome to Elephant! Those guys are nocturnal, so the behaviors you describe are completely normal. Adjusting your lights as you have is definitely a good thing- a regular, short photoperiod will help you establish a routine.

Also know that you’re totally welcome to share your dive photos with us!
Wow, so great! Nice job interacting and making it work - stealth observation mode. What an experience, congrats!

Mobile upload of vids should work, yes! But LMK if you have issues.
Hahaha, yes, stealth mode indeed! It makes so much sense when you take the time to think of what would spark a cephalopod’s curiosity! So 1) don’t scare it off by being too eager 2) think about what it wouldn’t usually see in another creature- because basically everything wants to eat them -if the cephalopod knows you’ve seen it yet aren’t making any advances to catch or eat it that will be strange and curious for them to see and if you just watch it being as still as you can hovering nearby- in my experience that makes them curious about you and they approach! Unfortunately it doesn’t usually get much on camera-because you can’t move lol. But the experiences are magical!
Okay, here goes video attempts!
 

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