• Welcome to TONMO, the premier cephalopod interest community, and birthplace of #WorldOctopusDay and #CephalopodAwarenessDays. Founded in 2000, we are a large community of experts, hobbyists and enthusiasts, some of whom come together when we host our biennial conference. To join in on the fun, sign up. You can also become a Supporter for just $50/year to remove all ads and enjoy other perks. Follow us on Twitter for more cephy goodness.

Discovered Small Clear Anemone In Tank

maplichen

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
15
I don't have a reef tank (just argonite substrate some fake plants and a few cuttlefish - s. officinalis in the tank) and there has never been a live rock placed in the tank in question, although it is possible that there might have been cross contamination from another tank I have that does contain live rock. I have had damsel fish in there on and off over the past couple years but only when there are not active cuttles in there and there have been no other animals. The anemone I pulled out today is small clear and my best guess is that is is aiptasia.

I have read that aiptasia have been known to hurt small invertebrate species. My question is, does anyone have experience with cuttlefish or other ceph interaction with anemones such as this and should I be worried about this becoming a serious issue. Also, is there anything else that this might be, or be indicative of, in my tank? Thanks for anyone who can help me out here.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,974
If you transferred bottom substrate from an existing tank, you may have introduced it in the live sand.

We have not had any reports of aiptasia stinging or leaving marks on cuttles or octopuses. I have the smaller kind in a tank that contained hatchling octopuses and even at this new age, there did not appear to be a problem.
 

maplichen

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
15
Thank you so much DWhatley. That is almost certainly what happened, I was just surprised because I had not seen anything like it appear in any tank I have worked with yet, even the one used to seed this tank. It may be that I just disturb the substrate too often through cleanings for them to take hold anywhere and missed a spot recently. Glad to hear I won't have to go all crazy on these things, I hear they are a nightmare to remove completely.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,974
I have a rock with the larger kind (I think they are commonly called Mojo). I tried a number of things to kill them but each attempt actually increased the population. Ultimately, I removed the rock and am starving it in an experimental tank. Without lighting and little food they start migrating to the bottom substrate and walls but after close to a year, I can still see one (which means there are likely more).

If you can keep peppermint shrimp (not usually a successful option with most cephs but I have had several survive a couple of octopuses) in a tank, they will usually take care of the newly propogated small ones but don't seem to touch them if they are dime sized. This does not eradicate them but does keep them under control.

Are you sure this was aiptasia? There is a harmless animal I have found that has a spongey egg like body with a crown but does not attach itself to anything. Aiptasia will appear like a gooy blob out of the water.
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
1,740
If you've used live cultured foods its possible it came from there as well. I have seen aptasia sting my M. Pfefferi on more than one occasion. If it is just the one I would try to scoop it out without disturbing it or injecting it with calcium hydroxide. If your system is infested you could either buy animals to eat them or soak your system in either fresh water or bleach (the bleach is an extreme method and should be a last resort).
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
1,740
D I think you are referring to majano anemones and calcium hydroxide works remarkable well on them. I've actually came across several species of "pest" anemones in the post few years. I've actually recently came across what appears to be a tulip or tridents trumpet snail. They have completely eradicated any and all pests that I have placed in there and appear to be reef safe. You can get them from tom's caribean.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,974
I will get a couple of the trumpets snail when I get an order from the Keys (just got a octo from there so it will be awhile) and give them a try on my experimental tank. The smaller type I have are in with Little Bit and no snail (or shrimp) would be safe with her as evidenced by her attack on my cowrie.

I have tried pickling lime on the majano a couple of times (a home made mix as well as commercially available ones). It dissolves them, they are gone for maybe two weeks and then there are at least 2 where there was one (this was not a clear result the first few times I tried it, I have had the rock for several years). Grinding them up with a stick and sucking out the parts produces the same results :yuck: Most have come out of the rock from starvation and lack of light and I have removed them whole from the bottom substrate or from the tank walls but, as mentioned, at least one continues to keep a holdfast in the LR.
 

maplichen

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
15
Thanks everyone. I'm not positive of the species of anemone and all I really have to verify this is checking against images and description which seem to match up well. And that's a great point I didn't think of Skywindsurfer. I have used aquacultured ghost shrimp although I avoid getting any of the water they are shipped in into my tanks where possible. It could have been that though.

This is actually the most predatory batch of Officinalis that I've been lucky enough to care for so I doubt the peppermint shrimp would be a great option here but I'll keep it in mind for if I move my guys around in the future and the tank is empty. I'm going to do a little research on that trumpet snail too. Great advice you guys, thanks so much.
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,974
Yes, cuddleycuddlefish, we are referring to glass anemones and they are most infamous for out stinging other corals (he who has he biggest sting wins). However, we don't keep many corals in a ceph tank and try to avoid altogether the kind that would do battle with these. In maplichen's case there are no intentional corals.

Skywindsurfer, could you give more detail on the observed stinging of the little cuttles? It would be good to note this in general. Did you see skin marks or leisons or did you just observe touch and retract reaction?

I found an article that you may want to read that has a few more suggestions. The one I found most interesting was the use of red leg hermits. Again, I am quite sure these would not survive with Little Bit but may with your Officinalis and are cheap enough to experiement with. In your case, you won't really know if they are effective since you only found one in the substrate but I think I will hijack one I know I have in another tank an put it the overflow to see if it will eradicate them there. Little Bit can stick her arms up into the area so I may lose the crab but it is worth an experiement.
 

Latest Posts

Forum statistics

Threads
20,939
Messages
207,039
Members
8,498
Latest member
acorn kid

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV (2011): Terri
TONMOCON V (2013): Jean
TONMOCON VI (2015): Taollan
TONMOCON VII (2018): ekocak


Top