ceph culture system

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Nov 22, 2004
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The shrimp is Halocaridina rubra which is cultured in very small numbers already but is expensive ($1-2 per shrimp). However, a lot of the ones being sold are wild caught which is bad because they're only found in a few small ponds around hawaii and if over collected they could eazily become endangered. I'm looking at trying to culture them on a large scale first and then see if they would be adequate as a mysid replacement.
 
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I have found a local source to catch live fresh water mysids. Im hesitant to use this as a main food source for hatchlings (bandensis at the moment). Do you have any thoughts or concerns about this?
 
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Paradox;110955 said:
I have found a local source to catch live fresh water mysids. Im hesitant to use this as a main food source for hatchlings (bandensis at the moment). Do you have any thoughts or concerns about this?

I would not have a problem using wild caught mysids. It's probably the best food currently available. I have not worked with fresh water mysids so I do not know if you could acclimate them to saltwater which you might have to do because if you just put them in the saltwater without acclimating them they might die.
 

DWhatley

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Unless I have my species mixed, these only spawn a few eggs each year so raising enought to sell may be a problem. Before they became a major conservation topic and were reasonably priced, I fed the red shrimp to my seahorses (the supplier has their own ponds but are facing restrictions anyway). There is a lot of controversy over using these as feeders and I hope you are successful getting the permits and raising them for this purpose as they are a great size and the red color attacks even the pickiest of horses. The color, however, would seem to be a problem for cephs.
 
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dwhatley;111008 said:
Unless I have my species mixed, these only spawn a few eggs each year so raising enought to sell may be a problem. Before they became a major conservation topic and were reasonably priced, I fed the red shrimp to my seahorses (the supplier has their own ponds but are facing restrictions anyway). There is a lot of controversy over using these as feeders and I hope you are successful getting the permits and raising them for this purpose as they are a great size and the red color attacks even the pickiest of horses. The color, however, would seem to be a problem for cephs.

I never said it would be easy :smile:. Each female spawns around 10-15 eggs a couple times a year. The good thing that makes them a good subject is they do not eat each other like mysids, they eat bacteria and algae unlike mysids that need a lot of artmia and they can be kept at higher densities. Again the enviromental effects from collecting is bad and from what I've been told some of the places selling them still collect them from the wild.

There is still not a lot known about how to raise them. First, I'm just trying to see what enviromental cues they use to breed and go from there and hopefully in the long term be able to culture them in large enough quantities to sell them as live food.
 

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