[Featured]: [Article]: Vampyroteuthis infernalis (by Phil Eyden)

Phil

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Ah, thank you very much. I had fun writing that article and it is really nice to know it was appreciated.

It's about time I started a new one. Overdue in fact.
 

willsquish

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Vampyronassa pic/info

Hello all,
I agree, this is a wonderful article. Phil, I read the old post saying you'd like info/pics on vampyronassa. I have the french copy of its description, and I have a picture of a nice specimen of Vampyronassa. I can take more if you want a close-up of a part. Attaching photo. Let me know if you want me to repost the photo to the gallery or if it gets automatically posted there.
--Will
 

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Architeuthoceras

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:welcome: to TONMO Will,
Thank you for posting the Photo, I think you have to post it to the gallery seperately. Any more close-ups of the little beastie would be well appreciated. Do you have access to the fossil?
 

Phil

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Hi Will,

Thanks everso much for that stunning contribution. I couldn't find any details about Vampyonassa when I wrote that article other than a few hints about its existance, and certainly no details. The picture you have provided is fascinating - the thing even looks like the Vampire Squid. Yes, any details you could provide will be very welcome, and please upload it to the gallery.

To set a context, Vampyronassa is about 162-165m years old (middle Jurassic) and was found at Volte-sur-Rhone in France, the same site as was found the unique specimen of Proteroctopus.

I imagine that this fossil must have caused quite a stir amongst those researchers studying vampyromorph cephalopods and coleoid evolution.

Thanks also for your kind words too!

Phil
 

Phil

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Is that a fin I can see at the posterior of the mantle?
 

Phil

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I've just found the abstract from the desription of Vampyronassa. Unfortunately the full article is $30 (don't you just hate that?):

Vampyronassa rhodanica nov. gen. nov sp., vampyromorphe (Cephalopoda, Coleoidea) du Callovien inférieur de la Voulte-sur-Rhône (Ardèche, France)

Jean-Claude Fischer, A and Bernard Riou

Annales de Paléontologie, Volume 88, Issue 1, January-March 2002, Pages 1-17



Abstract

Vampyronassa rhodanica nov. gen. nov. sp., Vampyromorpha (Cephalopoda, Coleoidea) from the Lower Callovian of la Voulte-sur-Rhône (Ardèche, France). The Vampyromorpha, an order of cephalopods closely related to Octopoda, have been yet undubitably identified only in recent time, always in deep oceanic waters. Their occurrence since the Middle Jurassic is evidenced by about twenty specimens from the Lower Callovian of la Voulte-sur-Rhône (Ardèche), which exhibit vampyromorph fundamental features : eight sessile arms showing one row of suckers with bordering cirri, a web uniting the arms, a pair of brachial tentacles, well shaped lateral eyes, an internal uncalcified supporting organ (gladius), a pair of supero-posterior fins, two postero-dorsal light-organs, no ink-sac. These specimens, here assigned to the new genus and species Vampyronassa rhodanica, still differ from recent Vampyromorpha by their two first dorsal sessile arms clearly longer than the others, their more important funnel and their longer and slightly more spindle-like body. This characteristic Middle Jurassic vampyromorph leads to admit a much older origin for this cephalopod order. The probably mesopelagic mode of life of this new vampyromorph is then tentatively examined. Critical arguments about the assignment to Vampyromorpha of three large teuthid-like species from the Upper Jurassic of Germany are developed.
 

willsquish

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Ah, yes.
The cost of articles is terrible, unless of course you are a student of a university as I am. :smile: Free access is good. However, in the full article the last english word you get is in the abstract. Altavista will probably get you an idea of what it all means. Also it's 700k or so whereas the attachment size for these messages is limited. I'll try the message service to get it to you. Also, yeah, the tiny blob at the very end of the cone appears to be the flap. It's somewhat poorly defined, since all the material was pyrite replaced and probably the flaps were almost if not sticking together while that took place.
--Will
 

willsquish

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Well, it turns out it's more like 800k. I can't seem to attach anything this big to anything else. So, I've posted it here:
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~wstoddar/vampyronassa.pdf
I should take it down in a week or so to make sure it doesn't appear on the google search and get the publishers mad at me. Also, another neat article:
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~wstoddar/voultesurrhone.pdf
This is on the whole formation with some belemnites in there as well. Also the clam or oyster that's above the vampy here and the not yet pictured shrimp that's behind it.
--Will
 
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:shock: Wow, that belemite fossil is amazing. As are most of the cephalopod fossils in that article.

I do have to say that the Thylacocepalid crustacean was a little scary looking...
 

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Well, if you have full access to the opriginal french version, I'd be willing (during the week-end) to translate it for you (French is my first language, my geology years were either in french or english and my paleontology class had both language).
 

Phil

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Thanks everso much for the the links Willsquish, the images were fascinating. Unfortunately my 'O' level grade 'C' French 1985 wasn't quite up to the job. If Stephanopod would like to have a crack at translating the cephalopod sections I'm sure we'd all very much appreciate it. Thank you for the offer.

Interesting to see the web has been reconstructed as varying in length dorsal - ventral. The overall shape is incredibly similar to Vampyroteuthis.

It was also to interesting to see Rhomboteuthis, that's one I had heard of, but have not seen a reconstruction before. The long tapering gladius reminds me of the much better known Plesioteuthis.
 

willsquish

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Stephanopod;96355 said:
Well, if you have full access to the opriginal french version, I'd be willing (during the week-end) to translate it for you (French is my first language, my geology years were either in french or english and my paleontology class had both language).

That'd be wonderful, though it is pretty huge (I fear it may take awhile).
 

Stephanopod

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Well, my main squeeze won't be back before the 22nd.That ought to keep my me away from almost certain temptations. Whci one shall I start with?

And by the way, I wouldn't mind having someone to check on overall style. Some of the french form might pop in once in a while.
 

willsquish

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Architeuthoceras;96228 said:
:notworth: Great articles Will, Thanks for posting those.

And thanks for the Pics.

Are you a :vampyro: :grad:

Well, I've been called a squid before, but only by my squid sister. I am a grad/ soon to be researcher, but not in this field I'm afraid, at least not in terms of being published/publishable. I envy those that are. I do aerospace engineering, but also was a naval architecture undergrad, along with an aero undergrad and a paleo minor. Took all the paleo classes offered at University of Michigan, and indeed did a term paper on the sutures of ammonites vs the nautiloid septae. That aside, I research only for my own curiosity, and probably won't be published, unless I switch over to paleo full time. I've heard that all sorts of majors can actually get into paleo grad program in University of Chicago or something. I'm almost tempted to go there, since aerospace is getting awfully competitive. Anyway, so that's my background.

Perhaps I am a :vampyro: and a :grad:, but not a professional :vampyro: :grad:
 
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